Tag Archives: The National Library of Australia

My Writing Journey

This week I wrote each day. I am pleased with the progress I have made on my WIP (work-in-progress). There are nineteen chapters (at the moment) and the story I outlined in January is closer to completion. I have edited about half the chapters, have one to finish, and one that might be deleted or changed in some way. The outline I wrote has been helpful in finding my way to this point. I hope to have the completed first draft of the novel finished by the end of this year and in January I will do a final edit. Christmas celebrations with my family and friends will slow the writing down. When the final draft is finished I will send it to the publisher in early February and keep my fingers crossed.  I will then work on the television proposal with Dave Sabben. The siren song of another story is calling me although I am not sure if this will be the one I will write. The story will be set in Australia (as part of my WIP is) and will not be a time-split novel (as my WIP is) but set in one historical period. It will be based on a true story that I came across some years ago. The threads of the story have stayed with me since this time. I will need to research the historical facts and also visit the area where the story is set to take photographs and visit dwellings. I won’t discuss the story itself as I don’t want anyone to influence how I go about writing this story. Once I start the writing of it I will document my journey here.  I will take  several empty notebooks  with me when I travel. I have six large notebooks of notes for my WIP. I don’t look at them I am writing but I will skim through them when I finish the final draft in case some gem of forgotten information is hidden there that I can use. When I start my research I read widely from contemporary diaries and novels and biographies set in the period. It is a constructive period of osmosis and the information surfaces as needed when I am writing.  Someone once said (Lytton Strachey?) that they needed three lives: one for leisure and friends and family, one for reading, and one for writing, how true! Good writing to everyone…Best, Elise

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My Writing Journey

I am still working on the outline of my WIP. It’s amazing how many ideas have been tossed out! Hopefully it will save me time when I start writing to have a lodestar to follow. It’s more fun than I thought and I’ll keep at it until it’s finished. I have outlined other books in the past but not to this extent and I’m pleased with the results so far. Other than outlining I’ve been reading books from the era (and a few lines from books not of the era!). Lots of research to do but now at least I won’t be wasting time on research that is wasted because of a discarded idea. And serindipity happens. I will tell you in a future blog about something that happened by accident that has led me to someone who knows much about the area and period I am writing about. I will be meeting her for the first time the week after next. Good writing for the next week…cheers Elise

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My Writing Journey

Have had a busy with with visiting relatives… I have nearly finished editing my WIP and transferring the corrections to the computer copy…I am enjoying the process but will be sooooo glad to finish and start work on my new novel…I will not be discussing the story line except to say that it will be set in Australia during WW2 in a magical, wondrous place…an unusual aspect of the story will a strange and compelling fact about music that not many people, other than musicians, know about. And as tends to happen in my life I have met the perfect person to help me research this part of the novel…he is an expert in his field of music and both composes and plays music…I haven’t decided yet if the story will be set in two different periods…if I do the other period will be early 20th century, a period when the old (Victorian) is giving way to the new…the world is about to be embroiled in the Great War…a time, when as in WW2 a whole generation of young people marched out the door and never came home again…I am fascinated by the influence of the past on the present…so a time split novel is a very much a possibility…this gestation period is great…an excuse to read lots of books and watch movies about the period I am researching…I will also return to a non-fiction book that has been waiting impatiently in the wings…it’s about my own journey with heart surgery…I needed an interesting slant for this book that is different from other books I have read before on heart surgery…I found it!….a writer’s life is never dull…have a good writing week…cheers Elise

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My Writing Journey

This week we have relatives staying from Sydney. I have been busy but have still found time to work on my WIP (work in progress). I am editing on hard copy and then transcribe the corrections to my computer. This is nuts and bolts work. When I am finished which I hope will be in a weeks time I am starting work on my next novel. Research, outline, reading books of the era and watching movies of the era. Have ideas racing around in my head and have to pin the main ones down. This is the gestation period of my novel and is a favourite part of my creative process. Good writing to everyone…cheers Elise.

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The Handwriting Exhibition

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Handwritten
ten centuries of manuscripts from staatsbibliothek zu berlin
Handwritten: ten centuries of manuscript treasures From Staatsbibliothek zu Berl
Date: 
26 November 2011 – 18 March 2012
Opening hours: 

Open daily
10am to 5pm 

Extended hours 2012
Open until 9pm on Thursdays
19 January to 15 March 2012
Open until 11pm on Fridays and Saturdays
2 and 3, 9 and 10 March 2012

Location: 
Exhibition Gallery
Cost: 
Free

free exhibition tickets

This extraordinary exhibition features 100 unique manuscript treasures from the Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin (Berlin State Library). Spanning more than 1000 years of history, the exhibition includes exquisite illuminated manuscripts, rare letters, sketches and documents and priceless musical scores, each handwritten by major figures in literature, religion, science, music, exploration and philosophy. Beethoven, Galileo, Goethe, Kafka, Michelangelo and Napoleon are just some of the many names represented in this exhibition.

From Dante’s Divine Comedy and a manuscript by Einstein, to Mozart’s Marriage of Figaro, this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to explore some of the most significant moments in thought and human endeavour.

The exhibition is being shown only in Canberra.

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The Handwriting Exhibition in Canberra, Australia

An email from my dear friend Bianca who lives in New South Wales, Australia.

I went firstly to see the Handwriting Exhibition with exhibits going back as far as The Venerable (Saint) Bede (673-635) to early 1900s.  Michelangelo’s handwriting was so beautiful and Marie Curies was perfectly formed. Napoleons was terrible. It was really exciting to see the handwriting of so many historically famous people. On Friday we went to see the Renaissance exhibition. The works were from the early period right through to the late period of the Renaissance. I found it most interesting to see the development from the stiff, flat expressionless figures of the early works, to the full rounded and expression filled figures of the final period. The richness of colour in the later works is amazing.
Of all the masterpieces, my favourite was by a lesser known painter, Cosme Tura ‘Madonna and Child’ (stylish in its composition, but the subtle expression of suffering on both faces reflects what is to come), plus Carlo Crivelli ‘Madonna and Child’ with all its symbolism, Bernardino Di Mariotto ‘The Lamentation of Christ’ (which(for me) could almost be a modern painting)  and Jacopo Bassano ‘Madonna and Child with the young Saint John the Baptist’ so full of tenderness and love. Andrea Solario’s ‘Ecce homo’ (Behold the man) is a small scale painting, which held me transfixed for quite some time. 
The portraits of Giovan Battista Moroni left me without words to describe them. If you can Google them, look up his painting ‘Portrait of a child of the house of Redetti’ and ‘Portrait of an old man seated’.  The exhibition is well worth seeing.
I then was able to take in an exhibition by the Australian photographer, Frank Hurley from his Antarctic collection.

 

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