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Take a visit to Shakespeare and Company if you are lucky enough to be in Paris.

SHAKESPEARE & COMPANY
DECEMBER 2012
EVENTS AT A GLANCE
Monday 3rd December 7pm
Humpty Dumpty Publishing presents Topsy Turvy Tales Monday 10th December 7pm
Launch of The White Review No.6
Thursday 13th December 6pm
Talk and tasting with Marc Grossman Tuesday 18th December 7pm
Storyteller Rachel Rose Reid
Wednesday 19th December 3pm
Children’s Hour with Kate Stables
Winter is closing in on the December streets and the darkening evenings are lit earlier by the old street lamps and new fairy lights. The City of Light comes into its own in the gloaming and architecture that is beautiful under blue skies is imbued with a new kind of magic at night. There is something magical, too, about entering the bookshop on a cold, dark evening, coming into the soft glow and cosy warmth. In the run up to Christmas, we have an array of wonderful events to tempt you in from the cobbles… macabre tales; new doyens of the literary magazine scene The White Review; a talk and tasty treats from the creator of Bob’s Kitchen and Juice Bar; wild and dreamy tales from a master storyteller…
This December also marks the one year anniversary of George Whitman’s death, and the 99 year anniversary of his birth. Shakespeare and Company is so absolutely entwined with the vision and personality of this man, who created the shop like a man would write a novel that his absence is inevitably felt. However, though he no longer lives as a figurehead above the shop, he is everywhere — wherever there are books and people and generosity and oddity and ideas. And he is nowhere more so than in Sylvia, his daughter, who has taken on his creation with an energy and imagination of her own. Today the shop is more alive than ever — we host a vibrant weekly schedule of readings, film screenings and concerts; Tumbleweeds — the young writers who live for free among the books — continue to tumble in as they have done for the past 60 or so years; and, as we continue to work on the history book project, mining the archives in the shop as it is today, we are moved by the largeness of what George achieved, and its continuing relevance. George liked to describe himself as the frère lampier, the lamp lighter, and Shakespeare and Company continues to be lit up, a beacon calling out to people all over the world.
DECEMBER EVENTS
Don’t forget, if you are unable to come to a particular event and want a signed copy of one of the author’s books (we can also post it to you) please email Alice.

Most events take place upstairs in the library (40 seats), on the ground level (50 seats) or outside in front of the bookshop. During the events, the sound from the reading and discussions is projected around the entire bookshop. We recommend you arrive 15–30 minutes early to try to get a seat as there is limited space.
MONDAY 3RD DECEMBER 7PM
Topsy Turvy Tales is an illustrated gift book of tales by Charlotte Boulay-Goldsmith and Laura Hyde of new and exciting, all female publishing company Humpty Dumpty Publishing, who team together writers and illustrators to publish exquisite and affordable gift books with a twist. Topsy Turvy Tales is a beautifully produced hardback with a black and white screen printed cover and a strong emphasis on playfulness of layout and graphics. Dark and twisted, heart-warming and fun, it has a Tim Burton and Edward Gorey quality.
For this festive event, Charlotte and Laura will be around if you’d like your copy signed and, upstairs, two of the tales from the book which have been adapted into animations, narrated by Maryam d’Abo and Bill Nighy, will be screened. There will also be wine, cupcakes from the excellent Bertie’s Cupcakery, live music by Lady Merxck and other surprises!
Review by Philip Colbert for Pas un Autre
Review by Laura Bailey for Vogue

MONDAY 10TH DECEMBER 7PM
Please join us to celebrate the launch of The White Review No. 6, notably featuring interviews with China Mieville, Julia Kristeva and Edmund de Waal, fiction by Helen DeWitt, essays on J. H. Prynne and Bela Tarr, artwork by Matt Connors and poetry by Emily Berry.
To mark the release of this new edition, editors Jacques Testard and Benjamin Eastham have put together a panel to discuss the past, present and future of literary magazines, including Christian Lorentzen (Senior Editor at the London Review of Books and editor of Say What You Mean: The n+1 Anthology), Craig Taylor (Five Dials, and the author of Londoners), Heather Hartley (Paris editor of Tin House) and Krista Halverson (former managing editor of Zoetrope).
THURSDAY 13TH DECEMBER 6PM
New York expat Marc Grossman, the creator of Bob’s Juice Bar (10e) and Bob’s Kitchen (3e) and author of several popular cookbooks, will be celebrating the release of his latest cookbook New York — Les Recettes Culte (ed. Marabout) at Shakespeare and Company. With over one hundred recipes across a wide range of sweet and savoury foods, New York — Les Recettes Culte is Marc’s largest and most ambitious book to date. “It’s everything I crave when I feel homesick,” says Marc. Stunning photos by Akiko Ida and Pierre Javell, as well as illustrations by Jane Teasdale, make this book as visually engrossing as it is appetizing. For the book signing, Marc has promised to personally prepare pies and other treats from the book. We cannot wait!
TUESDAY 18TH DECEMBER 7PM
“Immense skill and breathless conviction… there’s no faulting Reid’s command of her craft.”
— The Times

Join Rachel Rose Reid for a winding journey through poems, stories and songs that stretch from Grecian hills to the shores of Newfoundland, from ancient worlds to the present day. Dubbed Queen of the New Wave of Storytellers (BBC Radio 3), Rachel Rose Reid’s work reflects her upbringing between folk traditions and urban jungle, bridging across the oral heritage of our ancestors and the spoken word of today. She is currently Writer in Residence at the Dickens Museum in London and this year has also written and performed commissions for BBC Radio, the Royal Shakespeare Company and Billy Bragg’s centenary tribute to Woody Guthrie. So come along one and all and be enchanted on a cold winter’s night…
http://www.rachelrosereid.com
Rachel Rose Reid on Twitter / Facebook

WEDNESDAY 19TH DECEMBER 3PM
Children’s Hour — music, rhythm and stories for kids: Bring your children (2–6 year–olds, siblings welcome too) to the library at Shakespeare and Company for an hour of music, songs and stories in English (for all nationalities, even those who don’t speak English). Led by the magic Kate Stables, mum and singer/songwriter from This is the Kit, this lovely event is fast becoming an institution. There will be instruments to play and a lot of noise to make! Four euros donation appreciated.
SPECIAL EVENT
Shakespeare and Company at Wanderlust

For two days before Christmas those fashionable folk at Wanderlust are hosting the magical Joyeux Market — so come on down to the banks of the Seine and browse for beautiful trinkets and treats from an array of fabulous stalls. We’ll be there peddling our books, along with Kusmi Tea, Millimètres, Cherry Picker, Tattyoo, Bohemian Chic, WISP wild and wicked woolies, Roger-Bontemps, Juliette Beaupin, Jicqy les Mirettes, Mamamushi, Jip, and many more.

And, after you’re all shopped out, there’s a treasure hunt, a boutique hair salon, a photomaton, mulled wine, boulles, a barbecue, and much more to enjoy!
Saturday 15th December 2pm–11pm
Sunday 16th December 11am–7pm

5€ full price / 3€ student rate
Free for those under 12 Wanderlust, 32 quai d’Austerlitz, 75013 Paris

Joyeux Market at Wanderlust

STAFF AND TUMBLEWEED PICKS
THE YELLOW BIRDS BY KEVIN POWERS
The author’s first novel and clearly a very autobiographical account of a 21 year old soldier’s journey from the US training camps to fighting in Iraq in 2004. It explores the daily lives of soldiers, the fear and fatigue, their ambivalent attitude toward death: “nothing seemed more natural than someone getting killed.”

This is a story of friendship and loss and the often psychologically traumatic transition “back home” for many soldiers. It has been hailed as the All Quiet on the Western Front of America’s Arab wars. Immediately striking because of its poetic style, brilliantly structured, a style similar to Cormac McCarthy and Hemingway. I urge everyone to read it! Here’s a little taster from the first few pages: “While we slept, the war rubbed its thousand ribs against the ground in prayer. When we pressed onward through exhaustion, its eyes were white and open in the dark. While we ate, the war fasted, fed by its deprivation. It made love and gave birth and spread through fire.” — Sylvia
CONSTELLATION OF GENIUS BY KEVIN JACKSON
Constellation of Genius is the biography of modernism’s great year: 1922. Revolving around the two heavenly bodies of the modernist era — Eliot and Joyce — Jackson’s book works its way through the calendar months to highlight those events — jazz concerts, barfights and club openings included — that set the clock going on the 20th century’s greatest movement. A good read and great point of reference. — Terry
THE FINGERSMITH BY SARAH WATERS
This is Dickens with a twist — or, rather, many twists — a true page turner with orphans, mad houses, pickpockets, double dealings, and even dirty books. I’d hate to spoil anything, so I’ll keep this short: Poor and lowly orphan Sue Trinder is persuaded by a group of thieves to trick lonely, isolated heiress Maud Lilly into accepting her as a lady’s maid in order to gain access to Maud’s vast fortune. Their plan succeeds, for a while. — Krista
THE WIVES: THE WOMEN BEHIND RUSSIA’S LITERARY GIANTS BY ALEXANDRA POPOFF
Here is the picture described by Russian poet Nadhezda Volpin: “(…) Vladimir (Nabokov) would get out of a car with just a chess set and his butterfly collection while Vera would follow lugging two suitcases.” This scene is a perfect representation of what the lives of Anna Dostoyevsky, Sophia Tolstoy, Nadhiezda Mandelstam, Vera Nabokov, Elena Bulgakov and Natalia Solzhenitsyn were like. From giving inspiration and stimulation to acting as a technical help, the contribution of the wives of the greatest Russian writers to their work is remarkable and still very unrecognized by the majority of readers.

Alexandra Popoff gives us a complete and fascinating portrait written with empathy, admiration and an impressive knowledge of the women who sacrificed their lives, intellects, talents and ambitions in the name of literature, art, history and, of course, love. — Karolina
THE THIEF’S JOURNAL BY JEAN GENET
Jean Genet was the true enfant terrible of the twentieth century French literary scene. A thief, a vagrant, a beggar and unashamed homosexual lover of conmen and convicts, he gleefully inverted the virtues of his time and elevated vice to a pedestal. Yet in doing so and writing of his experiences in elegant, cut-glass prose Genet exposed an essential truth of the world that could not be easily belied, and led his contemporary Jean-Paul Sartre to call The Thief’s Journal “the most beautiful that Genet has written”. Arguably, Genet as a writer lies in anglophone culture as subservient to more famous classic French writers such as Camus or even Sartre himself, but as we the readers follow his autobiographical vagabond journey through Europe in this novel we begin to bond with his subversive outlook on society. As we do so we cut through the swathes of artificiality our own worlds might still be bound in now, and find a greater, more pertinent sense of our own concepts of art and life and love. — Patrick
AND SOME LOVELY CHRISTMAS GIFT IDEAS
POLPO: A Venetian Cookbook (Of Sorts) by Russell Norman Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi (cookbook)
Postcards from Penguin (100 bookjackets / 100 Vogue covers / 100 New Yorker covers) Bruce by Peter Ames Carlin (biography)
Waging Heavy Peace: A Hippie Dream by Neil Young (autobiography) The Golden Age of Botanical Art by Martyn Rix (non-fiction)
The James Bond Archives by Paul Duncan (boxed) Building Stories by Chris Ware (boxed graphic novel)
Both Flesh and Not by David Foster Wallace (essays) This Moose Belongs to Me by Oliver Jeffers (children)
I Want My Hat Back by Jon Klassen (children) Six Fairy Tales from Brothers Grimm, illustrated by David Hockney (children)
Emily Dickinson Reader by Paul Legault (humour) Dads are the Original Hipsters by Brad Getty (humour)
We also have a fantastic selection of vintage photoplay editions, both in hardback and paperback, with great covers and illustrations featuring scenes from favourite movies. Several of the scarcest titles are listed on our rare books website (along with lots of other rare gem gift ideas) and many more are available in the shop. Prices range from 7€ to 450€.
FURTHER LITERARY TIDBITS
Kevin Powers on The Yellow Birds
The future of Jewish fiction now that Philip Roth has retired

Douglas Coupland on storytelling and technology
I’m Hans Christian Anderson by Rachel Rose Reid

Beautiful ode to the life of George Whitman by Rachael Horowitz
Was Jack Kerouac really a hack?

Terry Pratchett on sex, death and nature
Interview with Orhan Pamuk

Terry Castle on Susan Sontag
Jonathan Safran Foer in The White Review

Successful film adaptations of literary classics

THE LAST WORD
“I CREATED THIS BOOKSTORE LIKE A MAN WOULD WRITE A NOVEL, BUILDING EACH ROOM LIKE A CHAPTER, AND I LIKE PEOPLE TO OPEN THE DOOR THE WAY THEY OPEN A BOOK, A BOOK THAT LEADS INTO A MAGIC WORLD IN THEIR IMAGINATIONS.”
— George Whitman
On 14th December we are planning an informal gathering in the library to celebrate the life of George Whitman and mark his passing. We will post further details on our website and Facebook page in the next week.
JOIN US on Facebook and FOLLOW us on Twitter @Shakespeare_Co for daily shop updates, event announcements, and general bookshop-in-Paris notes.

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Lining up for Rations in Paris, 1945


Paris, 1945

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Soir de Paris

It seems I have Paris on my mind this morning.

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Coco Chanel – Fashion Icon


An inspirational woman.

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Madame Gres, Paris

A piece of art from Paris

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Madame Gres, Paris

Every woman loves clothes from Paris

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Shakespeare and Company – Paris June 2012 Newsletter

For any of you lucky enough to be in Paris in June this year take a visit to Shakespeare and Company
Shakespeare and Company Newsletter June 2012

SHAKESPEARE & COMPANY
JUNE 2012
EVENTS AT A GLANCE
Wednesday 6 June 7pm
Nick Flynn, Ben Marcus, Robert Coover (fiction,& Now) Thursday 7 June 7pm
Jennifer Egan (fiction)
Wednesday 13 June 5pm
Debra Spark (lecture on writing in the library) Thursday 14 June 7pm
Erotiques by EE Cummings (bilingual readings outside)
Friday 15 June 6pm
Daniel Leven Becker on Oulipo (Philosophers in the Library) Saturday 16 June 3pm
Readings of Ulysses for Bloomsday by Jacques Lecoq actors (outside)
Monday 18 June 7pm
Adam Thirlwell Kaboom! (fiction) followed by Whim ‘n Rhythm (acapella) Monday 25 June 7.30pm
Lydia Davis (fiction, NYU series)
Wednesday 27 June 7.30pm
Dinaw Mengestu, Darin Strauss, Chris Adrian and Colson Whitehead (Granta panel chaired by John Freeman, NYU series)
June brings many wonderful warm, long days in Paris and an incredible selection of events at Shakespeare and Company. There will be a talk on the Oulipo as part of our Philosophers in the Library series and we’ll start our summer collaboration with New York University with some of America’s most interesting writers – and of course it’s Bloomsday! Come and celebrate James Joyce and one of the most important books ever published with readings outside under our tree. And in honour of our beat heritage and the release of the recent film On the Road, come and get your new or rare copy of Kerouac’s classic. Outside of the bookshop go and see Le Marché de la Poésie from June 14-17 at Place Saint Sulpice.

Colette Pillion (If you do not see the image, click here to view it)

Researching the Shakespeare and Company archives for the history book we are working on, we discovered the beautiful Colette Pillon, who in 1963 – when she was only 18 – founded the business Mademoiselle de Paris out of the bookshop. She provided tourists with personal guides to Paris. Guides were required to be students from good families, pretty, age 20 to 25, familiar with Paris, and fluent in multiple languages. When asked by a journalist whether any of the tours had ended in romance, she answered with a surprised look, ‘Mais pour un etranger, une jeune fille française, une Parisienne, est intouchable.’
In other news, the deadline for The Paris Literary Prize for a novella has just been announced – 1 September 2012. It’s open to unpublished writers from all around the world. The winner will receive €10,000 and the two runners-up will receive€2,000. All winners will be invited to Paris to attend the prize ceremony and read at Shakespeare and Company.
JUNE EVENTS
This month events are scheduled at various times and please note there will be limited seats for NYU events as students will have priority for those particular events. The sound from the reading and discussions are projected around the entire bookshop during the events. We recommend you arrive 15-30 minutes early to try to get a seat as there is limited space. Sauf mention contraire, les lectures se déroulent en langue anglaise. Elles ont lieu lelundi à 19 heures dans la bibliothèque (library – 40 places assises) ou au rez-de-chaussée (50 places assises). Les lectures et débats sont également diffusés en direct à l’aide de hauts-parleurs dans l’ensemble de la librairie. Nous vous suggérons d’arriver 15 à 30 minutes à l’avance afin de vous garantir une place assise.
SATURDAY 2 JUNE 5PM
New Orleans-based ‘The Collective’ is visiting Paris with their show UnRoute at the Pavé d’Orsay at 8pm on Friday 1st June, and will also be performing outside Shakespeare & Company on Saturday 2nd June at 5pm. UnRoute is a contemporary cabaret of theatrical vignettes presented from multiple viewpoints both in and out of our minds. A sprawling interdisciplinary experience of physical theater, dance, story-telling and live music, UnRoute encourages audiences as well as artists to follow different routes, and uproots them from the mundane to a world where anything is possible.
WEDNESDAY 6 JUNE 7PM
Tonight in collaboration with Paris’s& Now Festival of New Writing (6-10 June at Université de la Sorbonne) we welcome three of America’s most innovative writers, Robert Coover, Ben Marcus and Nick Flynn. They will be presented by Davis Shneiderman, co-founder of &Now and a writer and Professor at Lake Forest College.
Robert Coover is one of America’s pioneering postmodernists ‘one of the most original and exciting writers around. Every new book from him is great news.’ – McSweeney’s
Ben Marcus is the author of four books of fiction, the most recent The Flame Alphabet. ‘Ben Marcus is the rarest kind of writer: a necessary one. It’s become impossible to imagine the literary world -the world itself- without his daring, mind-bending and heartbreaking writing.’
- Jonathan Safran Foer
Nick Flynn is the author of three collections of poetry and two memoirs. Another Bullshit Night in Suck City (Being Flynn) is a ‘stunningly beautiful memoir’ (San Francisco Chronicle) which was recently made into a film with starring Robert De Niro and Paul Dano.
THURSDAY 7 JUNE 7PM
In collaboration with Editions Stock, we’re thrilled to welcome Jennifer Egan to present her brilliant novel, and one of the most talked-about books in recent times, A Visit From The Goon Squad. It was both the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, a National Book Critics Circle Award Winner and a PEN/Faulkner Award Finalist. There will also be a short reading from the recently published French edition Qu’avons-nous fait de nos rêves ? ‘A spiky, shape-shifting new book … A display of Egan’s extreme virtuosity.’
- The New York Times
Jennifer Egan is the author of The Keep, Look at Me, The Invisible Circus, and the story collection Emerald City. Her stories have been published in The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, GQ, Zoetrope, All-Story, and Ploughshares, and her nonfiction appears frequently in The New York Times Magazine.
WEDNESDAY 13 JUNE 5-6PM
A lecture on writing in the library by author Debra Spark on ‘The Trigger: Where Do Stories Come From?’ Where do writers get their ideas? Overheard conversations, personal history, dreams, stray remarks. This one-hour lecture talks about inspiration by referencing writers as various as Henry James, Virginia Woolf, Ivan Turgenev, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Joan Didion, and John Irving. For writers at any level -true beginners; those who want to get jumpstarted on a new project; those who may be stuck in their own work; or those who would just like to have a conversation about the imagination.
THURSDAY 14 JUNE 7PM
In celebration of Paris’s Marché de la Poésie join us for an evening of bilingual readings of Erotiques by one of our favourite American poets E.E.Cummings. There will be readings from Lola Peploe, Laura Piani and the book’s translator Jacques Demarcq. Published by Editions Seghers, this new bilingual French and English book is a collection of Cumming’s most beautiful poems and erotic drawings.
A l’occasion de l’ouverture du Marché de la poésie, nous vous convions le 14 juin 2012 à une lecture des poèmes du virtuose E. E. Cummings dont les Editions Seghers publient une anthologie bilingue de textes et dessins érotiques. Cette anthologie couvre quarante ans de la vie de Cummings, des années 1920 aux années 1960, reflétant les expériences du poète qui sera marié à Elaine, puis Anne et enfin Marion. Dans son oeuvre, l’érotisme apparaît comme une esthétique du partage, une communion avec la nature et ses cycles, une fenêtre ouverte sur le mystère de la vie. Depuis plus de trente ans, le poète Jacques Demarcq traduit Cummings avec la même passion du rire et du rythme.
FRIDAY 15 JUNE 6PM
As part of our Philosophers in the Library series come and hear Daniel Levin Becker, author of Many Subtle Channels, discussing the intriguing Parisian collective the Oulipo. Here’s an excerpt from his book published in The Believer to whet your appetite. Please note, his event in the Library has limited space, first in first seated.
The Oulipo is a collective of writers and scientists founded in 1960 to explore the possibilities of using mathematical and linguistic structures to generate literature. Since its inception, the Oulipo has yielded such curious experiments as the first choose-your-own-adventure fiction in history; a mystery novel written without the letter E; a romance novel in which the respective genders of the lovers are never specified; a children’s story featuring a code that took readers over twenty-five years to decipher; a book of poems made from anagrams of the names of Parisian métro stations; and a set of ten identically rhymed sonnets printed on flaps that can be combinatorially manipulated by the enterprising reader to create, at least in theory, one hundred trillion distinct poems. Many Subtle Channels is a book about the Oulipo from the perspective of a young American who went to Paris to learn whether these people were, you know, serious about all this, and returned a full-fledged Oulipian. He will be on hand to read from his book, discuss the guises of ‘potential literature’ in the real world, and gingerly entertain your most incredulous questions.
MONDAY 18 JUNE 7PM
Tonight British writer Adam Thirlwell will discuss his new book Kapow! Exploding with unfolding pages and multiple directions, Kaboom! is set in the thick of the Arab Spring, guided by the high-speed monologue of an unnamed narrator -over-doped, over-caffeinated, overweight- trying to make sense of this history in real time. Afterwards there will be acapella with Whim ‘n Rhythm, Yale’s all-senior, all-female acappella group.
Adam Thirlwell is the author of two novels,Politics and The Escape, and a book on the international art of the novel. He is the guest editor of an issue ofMcSweeney’s magazine, to come out in Winter 2012.
MONDAY 25 JUNE 7.30PM
In collaboration with New York University’s summer writing programme we present one of America’s most original and influential writers and translatorsLydia Davis. ‘Sharp, deft, ironic, understated, and consistently surprising.’ -Joyce Carol Oates ‘Davis is a magician of self- consciousness. Few writers now working make the words on the page matter more.’ – Jonathan Franzen
Lydia Davis’s books include a novel, The End of the Story, four full-length story collections -Varieties of Disturbance, Samuel Johnson Is Indignant, Almost No Memory, and Break It Down- and several small-press and limited-edition volumes. Davis works as a translator of French literature and philosophy, and is well known for her translation of Proust’s Du côté de chez Swann, which earned her wide critical acclaim. Her other translations include books by Gustav Flaubert, Maurice Blanchot, Pierre Jean Jouve, and Michel Leiris. She has won many of the major American writing awards, including a MacArthur Fellowship for fiction, and was named a Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters by the French government. She was a finalist for the 2007 National Book Award. See a great interviewwith her in The Believer.
WEDNESDAY 27 JUNE 7.30PM
In collaboration with NYU’s summer writing programme we present some of American’s most exciting writers, Dinaw Mengestu, Darin Strauss, Chris Adrian and Colson Whitehead, in a panel chaired by Granta’s John Freeman on The Worst, Terrible Thing. The writers will discuss how each of them has written into the heart of a horror (of some sort) and emerged with a story.
ALSO IN PARIS
Tuesday 19 June at 6.30pm: As part of the Australian Embassy’s NAIDOC celebrations, Australian historian Bill Gammage will present his acclaimed work The Biggest Estate on Earth – How Aborigines made Australia. For more information please contact Michele DuMont.

Friday 22 June at 12.30pm at the Australian Embassy Food historian Barbara Santich, will present ‘Bold Palates – Australia’s Gastronomic Heritage’ For more information please contact Michele DuMont

RECOMMENDED READS FROM SHAKESPEARE AND COMPANY
THE ART OF FIELDING BY CHAD HARBACH
There was a young writer named Chad
Who gave writing all that he had
His characters played ball,
They would rise, they would fall,
‘n’ once they were done, I was sad.
I’m also half way through a fascinating novel called With the Animals by Noëlle Revaz which I will write about next month once I have finished it, and while I have not yet started the much-hyped Naked Singularity by Sergio de la Pava, its high impact swirly jacket keeps catching my eye every time I pass our fiction table (on average 57 times a day), so I reckon I might start it any day now … –Linda
ANOTHER VENTRILOQUISTBY ADAM GILDERS
Published by J&L Books this is a selection of refreshingly odd, absurdist short stories / vignettes / aphorisms. They’re sort of parables about the inanity of our days –funny, weird and somehow honest. The narration has this particularly deadpan tone underlying all the stories that I loved. It reminded me of how fiction can be a flexible playful thing and anything is possible. With chapter titles so good you don’t know which one to choose first: Strong Male Presence, Police, Physically, Foreign Painter, One Theory About My Marriage’. The story ‘Edgar’ starts: That was already more than Edgar was prepared for. The young lady sat on his knees. Edgar had enough trouble keeping his balance to begin with. Slowly the young woman was trying to break down Ed’s confidence. ‘You will never be a writer of pornography, Edgar, you just don’t have what it takes.’
Another J&L title in our antiquarian is one of the rare remaining copies of photographic book,Dancing Pictures which I also love for its quirk.– Jemma
SAVAGE CONTINENT: EUROPE IN THE AFTERMATH OF WORLD WAR II BY KEITH LOWE
This fascinating account of the historical no-man’s land between the end of the war and the economic boom of the 1950s presents Europe as a hellish disaster zone. 1946 saw the ravaged European landscape swarming with gangs of orphaned children, traumatised refugees, brutalised soldiers, former slaves, and holocaust survivors. All these millions of people were looking to return home, to places which had been obliterated, often in turn, by the Nazis, by allied bombing and by the Red Army.
Modern Europe was built over these traumas and Keith Lowe presents a balanced portrait of how ineffectually this savage continent was rehabilitated. Required reading for anyone with an interest in the future of the European Union. – Saara
MEMORIES LOOK AT ME BY TOMAS TRANSTROMER
I’ve never read any poetry by the 2011 Nobel Prize Winner Tomas Transtromer so I thought this attractive, slim volume looking back at his life as a streak of light, the form of a comet would be a good introduction. It’s a collection of memories pinpricked throughout his childhood: vague, important, unimportant memories that stand alone and clear to him and are very telling. His devoted school teacher Mother and absence of his Father; the first time he experienced death, at 5, having lost the secure grip of his Mother’s hand in a frenzied crowd; his collection of beetles and realisation that the ground was alive, that there was an infinite world of creeping and flying things living their own rich life without paying the least regard to us; his hatred of the Nazis and his political engagement at the age of 9 and his discovery of poetry in Latin classes with a furious teacher. Read this in one sitting: it’s moving, reflective and timeless. We always feel younger than we are. I carry inside myself my earlier faces, as a tree contains its ring. The sum of “them” is me. The mirror sees only my latest face, while I know all my previous ones.– Sylvia
DISPATCH FROM ATLANTIS BOOKS, OIA, SANTORINI – Terry
My better half and I spent last week sleeping amongst the shelves, not at Shakespeare and Company as might immediately spring to mind, but at Atlantis Books. Upon returning to Paris our hearts’ gossamers remain attached to the place and it would be crude to cite as sole cause the shop’s beauty, which their website keenly evidences. Perhaps it’s that selling books here happens as naturally as laughing, drinking raki, building desks, swimming, recording their podcast or telling stories late into the night. They’re fighting the good fight, publishing beautiful books and welcoming the passerby. May they weather the storm of Greece’s financial woes and may readers of this newsletter help them do so: visit, buy a book and tell them a good story.
FURTHER LITERARY TIDBITS
In preparation of Lydia Davis’s reading at the bookshop later this month, readWings and
Sample the intriguing John Jeremiah Sullivan’s Sources for the Princes inThe Paris Review
Miss Lora fiction by Junot Diaz and
Adam Gopnik on Can Science Explain Why We Tell Stories in The New Yorker
Listen to Marilynne Robinson in The Guardian’s books podcast
Mark Ford on Pound Writers Home in The London Review of Books

Jared Diamond on What Makes Countries Rich or Poor and
Kushinagar(originally in French in publication XXI) by Joe Saccoin The New York Review of Books
An interview with Jonathan Safran Foer in The White Review

THE LAST WORD
“THE WORLD IS FULL OF FICTIONAL CHARACTERS LOOKING FOR THEIR STORIES.”
Diane Arbus

“THE ONLY PEOPLE FOR ME ARE THE MAD ONES, THE ONES WHO ARE MAD TO LIVE, MAD TO TALK, MAD TO BE SAVED, DESIROUS OF EVERYTHING AT THE SAME TIME, THE ONES WHO NEVER YAWN OR SAY A COMMONPLACE THING, BUT BURN, BURN, BURN, LIKE FABULOUS YELLOW ROMAN CANDLES EXPLODING LIKE SPIDERS ACROSS THE STARS AND IN THE MIDDLE YOU SEE THE BLUE CENTERLIGHT POP AND EVERYBODY GOES ‘AWWW!'”
Jack Kerouac
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Evening in Paris

Evening in Paris
A beautiful image.

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The third floor of Shakespeare & Company in Paris.

This is the third floor of Shakespeare & Company in Paris with a bed and the notice board behind it. I will share more pictures of unusual and beautiful bookstores with you in future posts.

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Inside Shakespeare and Company, Paris

ImageShakespeare and Company (bookstore)

I love old-fashioned bookstores and this is one of the most beautiful bookstores in the world.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Shakespeare and Company

 
Location Paris, France
Type Bookstore
Opened 1951
Owner Sylvia Beach Whitman
Website shakespeareandcompany.com

Shakespeare and Company is the name of two independent bookstores on Paris’s Left Bank. The first was opened by Sylvia Beach on 17 November 1919 at 8 rue Dupuytren, before moving to larger premises at 12 rue de l’Odéon in the 6th arrondissement in 1922.[1] During the 1920s, it was a gathering place for writers such as Ezra Pound, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce and Ford Madox Ford.[1] It closed in 1941 during the German occupation of Paris and never re-opened.[2]

The second is situated at 37 rue de la Bûcherie, in the 5th arrondissement. Opened in 1951 by George Whitman, it was originally named “Le Mistral” but renamed to “Shakespeare and Company” in 1964 in tribute to Sylvia Beach’s bookstore.[3] Today, it serves both as a regular bookstore and as a reading library, specializing in English-language literature. The shop was featured in the Richard Linklater film Before Sunset and in the Woody Allen film Midnight in Paris.[4]

Sylvia Beach’s bookstore

 

 

Poet’s Corner

Sylvia Beach, an American expatriate from New Jersey established Shakespeare and Company in 1919 on 8 rue Dupuytren. The store functioned as a lending library as well as a bookstore.[5] Beach moved to a larger location at 12 rue de l’Odéon in 1921, where the store remained until 1941.[1] During this period, the store was the epicenter of Anglo-American literary culture and modernism in Paris. Writers and artists of the “Lost Generation,” such as Ernest Hemingway, Ezra Pound, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, George Antheil and Man Ray spent a great deal of time at Shakespeare and Company, and it was nicknamed “Stratford-on-Odéon” by James Joyce, who used it as his office.[6] Its books were considered high quality and reflected Beach’s own literary taste. Shakespeare and Company, as well as its literary denizens, was mentioned in Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast. Patrons could buy or borrow books like D. H. Lawrence’s controversial Lady Chatterley’s Lover, which had been banned in Britain and the United States.

Beach initially published Joyce’s book Ulysses in 1922, which was banned in the United States and in the United Kingdom. Subsequent editions of Ulysses were published under the Shakespeare and Company imprint in later years.[7]

The original Shakespeare and Company was closed in 14 June 1940, during the German occupation of France during World War II. [2] It has been suggested the store may have been ordered shut because Beach denied a German officer the last copy of Joyce’s Finnegans Wake.[8] When the war ended, Hemingway “personally liberated” the store but, despite this, it never re-opened.[9]

[edit] George Whitman’s bookstore

In 1951, another English-language bookstore was opened on Paris’s Left Bank by an American George Whitman, under the name of Le Mistral. Its premises, the site of a 16th-century monastery,[10] are at 37 rue de la Bûcherie, near Place Saint-Michel, just steps from the Seine, Notre Dame and the Île de la Cité.[10] Much like the original Shakespeare and Company, the store became a focal point for literary culture in bohemian Paris, and was frequented by many Beat Generation writers, such as Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, and William S. Burroughs.[10]

In 1964, after Sylvia Beach’s death, Whitman changed his store’s name to Shakespeare and Company in tribute to the original venture.[3] He described the bookstore’s name as “a novel in three words”.[3] and calls the venture “a socialist utopia masquerading as a bookstore”.[11] Customers have included the likes of Henry Miller, Anaïs Nin, and Richard Wright. The bookstore includes sleeping facilities, with 13 beds, and Whitman claims as many as 40,000 people have slept in the shop over the years.[11]

Regular activities that occur in the bookshop are Sunday tea, poetry readings and writers’ meetings.[12] Whitman’s daughter, Sylvia Beach Whitman, now runs the shop.[12]

George Whitman died at the age of 98 on December 14, 2011.

[edit] Sylvia Beach Whitman

George Whitman’s daughter, Sylvia Beach Whitman, has now taken over the day-to-day running of the shop, and continues to run the store in the same manner as her father, allowing young writers to live and work in the shop.[12] She has also started a biennial literary festival, FestivalandCo, which has hosted such writers as Paul Auster, Siri Hustvedt, Jeanette Winterson, Jung Chang and Marjane Satrapi.[13][12] Sylvia Whitman has appeared on the Paris episodes of The Late, Late Show with Craig Ferguson, which aired the week of August 1, 2011.

 

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