Tag Archives: Movies

Beauty and the Beast

I love fairytales (I do not split the word fairytale in two). On my bookshelf, from my childhood library, is a first edition (1949) copy of The Little Good People, Folk Tales of Ireland, by Kathleen Foyle, with illustrations by Peter Fraser. An excerpt from the preface:

‘You come on it in the cool of dawning, or at nightfall when the bats are flying and the old cummers lay by their knitting – Tir nan Og, fair land of promise and gathered dreams. For some it lied no farther than the bend of the road; and there are others who must retrace their steps to glimpse it with longing through a weariness of years. But all travel by way of a sleeping wood.’

‘It is but a step from the Sleeping Wood to the magic glades of Tir nan Og, the Irish fairyland, where glad hearts find eternal youth, and where the Little Good People stay safe and sheltered.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=knOJffdGDdg         (copy and paste the link to your search engine)

This is the trailer for  Beauty and the Beast a film on my ’to see list’. I love the richness of the story and the visual images of glowing costumes and scenery. I want my blog to be rich and colourful and filled with all things French. With Paris and Gothic and mystery and literature and the 19th century; this video is all these things. I have always felt a connection to France. Of course, my own wonderful homeland of Australia: the bush and the  Indian Ocean coastline where I have a house in Western Australia (Tim Winton country)  is the true country of my heart.

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Filed under Elise McCune, What Elise Wrote

Louise Brooks

Louise Brooks

Louise Brooks: she could have stepped out of the past and not looked out of place in the modern world. She was a brilliant actress and also a writer.

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Filed under A Writer’s Notebook

Harold and Maud

A wonderful movie.
Harold Chasen (Bud Cort) is a young man obsessed with death. He regularly stages elaborate fake suicides, attends funerals, and drives a hearse, all to the chagrin of his mother, socialite Mrs. Chasen (Vivian Pickles).
At a funeral service for a total stranger, Harold meets Maude (Ruth Gordon), a 79-year-old woman who shares Harold’s hobby of attending funerals. He is entranced by her quirky outlook on life, which is bright and excessively carefree in contrast with his own morbidity. The pair form a bond, and Maude slowly shows Harold the pleasures of art and music (Harold is taught to play banjo), and teaches him how to ‘make the most of his time on earth.’ Meanwhile, Harold’s mother determines much against Harold’s wishes, to find him a wife to settle down with. One by one, Harold frightens and horrifies each of his appointed dates by appearing to commit gruesome acts such as self-immolation, self-mutilation, and seppuku.
As they become closer, Harold announces that he will marry Maude, resulting in disgusted outbursts from his family, psychiatrist and priest. Maude’s 80th birthday arrives, and Harold throws a surprise party for her. As the couple dances, Maude tells Harold that she ‘couldn’t imagine a lovelier farewell.’ He immediately questions Maude as to her meaning, and she reveals that she has purposely taken an overdose of sleeping pills and will be dead by midnight. She restates her firm belief that 80 is the proper age to die.
Harold rushes Maude to the hospital, where she is treated unsuccessfully and dies. In the final sequence, Harold’s car is seen going off a seaside cliff, but after the crash, the final shot reveals Harold standing calmly atop the cliff, holding his banjo. After gazing down at the wreckage, he dances away, picking out on his banjo Cat Stevens’ ‘If You Want to Sing Out, Sing Out’.

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Filed under A Writer’s Notebook