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What Elise Wrote-Allen & Unwin

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Allen & Unwin is an Australian independent publishing company, established in Australia in 1976 as a subsidiary of the British firm George Allen & Unwin Ltd., which was founded by Sir Stanley Unwin in August 1914 and went on to become one of the leading publishers of the twentieth century.

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Sir Stanley Unwin (What a happy smile, I’d like to have known Stanley!)

George Allen and Sons was established in 1871 by George Allen, with the backing of John Ruskin, becoming George Allen and Unwin in 1914 as a result of Sir Stanley Unwin’s purchase of a controlling interest. Unwin’s son Rayner S. Unwin and nephew Philip helped run the company, which published the works of Bertrand Russell, Arthur Waley, Roald Dahl and Thor Heyerdal. It became well known as J. R. R. Tolkien’s publisher, some time after publishing the popular children’s fantasy novel The Hobbit in 1937, and its high fantasy sequel The Lord of the Rings novel in 1954–1955.

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Reference: D B Derbyshire Bookseller.

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Rayner Unwin retired at the end of 1985, and the firm was amalgamated in 1986 with Bell & Hyman to form “Unwin Hyman Limited”. Robin Hyman became chief executive of the combined Unwin Hyman. From this time Allen & Unwin was an Australia-based, child company of Unwin Hyman. Rayner Unwin returned for a while as part-time chairman of Unwin Hyman, retiring again at the end of 1988. It was over the objections of largest shareholder Unwin that Hyman sold the firm to HarperCollins.[2] HarperCollins has since sold Unwin Hyman’s academic book list to Routledge.

Allen & Unwin in Australia
Allen & Unwin Australia Pty Ltd became independent in July 1990 by means of a management buy-out when the UK firm was bought by HarperCollins. Now known simply as “Allen & Unwin” the company went on to become the most successful “independent” in Australia and currently publishes up to 250 new titles a year.

Allen & Unwin publishes across a broad range of areas including literary and commercial fiction, popular and serious non-fiction – including biography, memoir, history, true crime, politics, current affairs and travel – academic and professional, children’s books and books for teenagers. Amongst the many authors published by Allen & Unwin are Alex Miller, Christos Tsiolkas, Garth Nix, Jodi Picoult, Kate Morton, Michael Connelly, Thomas Keneally, Peter Corris, Paul Keating, Stephanie Dowrick and Christopher Hitchens. Allen & Unwin is also co-sponsor and publisher of the annual Australian/Vogel Literary Award.

The Allen & Unwin head office is in Sydney and the company also publishes out of offices in Melbourne, Auckland and London. Allen & Unwin also represents a number of leading independent British publishers in the Australian and New Zealand markets. These include Bloomsbury, Faber & Faber, Profile Books and Serpent’s Tail, Atlantic and Corvus, Granta and Portobello, Canongate, Nicholas Brealey, Icon and Nosy Crow. Allen & Unwin distributes the Harry Potter series of books in Australia and New Zealand under the Bloomsbury imprint.

Since the inaugural award in 1992, Allen & Unwin has been voted Publisher of the Year twelve times including in 2013. The Founder and Chairman of Allen & Unwin is Patrick Gallagher, the CEO is Robert Gorman and the Publishing Director is Sue Hines.

I am fortunate indeed to be published by Allen & Unwin Australia.

The team at Allen & Unwin worked hard to bring Castle of Dreams to publication and recently sold the Norwegian publishing rights to Cappelen Damm.

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I can’t wait to see the translated copy!

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Sources: Wikipedia, Elise McCune

 

 

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What Elise Wrote-Publication Day

Publication day today! Castle of Dreams is finally winging its way out into the world. I can’t tell you how much the characters in the story mean to me. If they walked through my door right now I’d know them.

I am so happy to have Allen and Unwin as my publisher and Cappelen Damm as my Norwegian publisher.

Wine and chocolates have arrived all the way from my dear friend Bernie in Perth, WA and lots of wonderful messages of congratulations from family and friends.

1940’s era

Vivien

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Tony nodded. ‘I noticed her beauty, of course–what man wouldn’t notice a beautiful woman?–but what I fell for was her ability to make anyone she spoke to feel special, as though you were of the utmost importance to her.’ He paused, looking slightly embarrassed. ‘What I mean is that Viv had the quality of grace.’

Rose

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I tried to picture the two sisters as they must have been: Rose in a swing-skirt, her copper-coloured hair, shot through with gold, in waves over her shoulders; Vivien stretched out on the lawn reading a magazine, wearing a lilac-coloured dress and a gardenia in her dark hair. The world they’d inhabited in those distant days at Castillo de Suenos was no more, but I could see them as clearly as if it were today.

Robert Shine

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As her eyes become accustomed to the dark she glanced to her left and noticed the American looking at her. She felt herself colouring up and wished William had sat in the back seat with him instead of her.

The American smiled. ‘It sure feels good to be safe, ma’am.’

Then, William turned around, his expression impassive. ‘Vivien, you’ll have to make up the guest room with clean sheets when we arrive home.’

‘Yes, of course,’ she said, quickly.

‘Thank you both for your help,’ said the American.

When Vivien looked at him he held her gaze, she blushed again, but she didn’t turn away.

Ruby (the mother of Vivien and Rose)

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Her mother picked up Vivien’s cup and offered to read her tea-leaves. Vivien laughed. ‘Oh, go on then. It’s been a while, Ma.’

Ruby inspected the tea-leaves. A slight frown flickered across her face, and she glanced at her elder daughter. Seeing Vivien watching her, she smiled. ‘You’ve always had a fortunate future, Viv.’

Vivien sniffed. ‘Ma, you always leave out the bad parts when you read my cup. Come on, what can you see?’

Her mother laughed uncomfortably, turned the cup around. ‘I see two parrots–surely that’s lucky.’

Contemporary era

Stella (Rose’s granddaughter)

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These days I travelled Australia and the world taking photographs, always looking forward to my next assignment, yet on my last morning in Vietnam I’d walked the streets, breathing in the smell of piquant spices, the sounds of traffic and voices all around me, wishing I could stay longer.

‘Your old school friend Jack rang us when you were in Vietnam. He’s a pleasant chap,’ said my father interuppting my thoughts. Turning onto the highway, he drove steadily, past cane fields, paddocks speckled with grazing cattle, and a little country cemetery enclosed within an iron-railed fence.

Jack

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At school, Jack and I had been good mates. Not long after I’d moved to Sydney, I’d visited him in his flat in an old subdivided mansion in King’s Cross. My eyes ran over the piles of books and the reproduction Renaissance Madonnas in gilt frames he’d started to collect.

There are other characters in Castle of Dreams: William, Tony, Harry, Margaret, Florence, Maggie, Edie and others but  Castillo de Suenos the Castle of Dreams is of course another character.

Castillo de Suenos (aka Paronella Park)

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What Elise Wrote-Castle of Dreams

Three days until Castle of Dreams is published.

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Allen & Unwin sold the Norwegian rights to Cappelen Damm recently and my Norwegian editor is Jorid Mathiassen.

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Growing up together in a mysterious castle in northern Queensland, Rose and Vivien Blake are very close sisters. But during World War II their relationship becomes strained when they each fall in love with the same dashing but enigmatic American soldier. Rose’s daughter, Linda, has long sensed a secret in her mother’s past, but Rose has always resisted Linda’s questions, preferring to focus on the present. Years later Rose’s granddaughter, Stella, also becomes fascinated by the shroud of secrecy surrounding her grandmother’s life. Intent on unraveling the truth, she visits the now-ruined castle where Rose and Vivien grew up to see if she can find out more. Captivating and compelling, Castle of Dreams is about love, secrets, lies—and the perils of delving into the past.

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Short Excerpt (1942):

It was a warm summer evening with a storm threatening. Vivien stepped out of the taxi in front of a two-storey house set back from the road behind a wrought-iron fence. In a wealthy suburb a mere four miles from the city, the house had an understated grace Vivien found appealing.

She unlatched the gate and walked up the path. Light spilled from the diamond-paned  windows across a square patch of lawn. Virginia creeper had rambled up to the first floor and feathered the window frames.

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Vivien (aka Gene Tierney)

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Good writing and reading

Elise

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What Elise Wrote-For the Love of Writing

It’s only a week now until Castle of Dreams is published by Allen & Unwin. I have a Norwegian publisher, Cappelen Damm, and my Norwegian editor is Jorid Mathiassen who wrote to me:

‘I am your Norwegian editor and I love your book, it’s such a wonderful story!’

Wonderful, that one day I will hold a copy of my novel translated into Norwegian.

To be a storyteller is magical. I’m often asked about the process of writing and the simplest answer I can give you is to read. When I was four years old I read picture books with text to my younger cousins and because I couldn’t understand many of the words  I made them up to match the story. The art of storytelling is a long one in history. Think of Scheherazade, a legendary Arabic queen and the storyteller of One Thousand and One Nights and of times past when before the written word stories were told around fires at night.

Have you heard the maxim ‘read everything’?   I don’t agree. Read only what interests you and read good writers of fiction. How else will you learn to write? If you read everything you certainly won’t have time write a novel. If you read rubbish it will creep into your narrative. Join a library if you can’t afford to buy new books and study  the structure of the novels you read.

Stop watching television if you don’t have time to write a novel. It’s amazing how many hours can be spent watching television each week; enough time in which to write a novel.

If you work during the day perhaps get up an hour earlier. A page a day is a novel in a year. Time to write should be a right and not a privilege.

Don’t treat writing like a hobby but rather as the job you love best in all the world.

Have a lovely day,

Elise

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