Monthly Archives: June 2017

The Rose

A gift from my daughter this year was ‘The Rose’  The history of the World’s favourite flower with classic texts and beautiful rare prints. Written by Brent Elliott, Historian, Royal Horticultural Society the society shares the best in gardening.

The Rose

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Audrey Hepburn, an icon of class and beauty, had a rose named after her. The rose named after Audrey is a soft apple-blossom pink hybrid tea rose. The blossoms are a deep pink in bud, but when they open they become a softer pink and then almost white. She grew them in her garden and in a bouquet you have different hues of colour.

Audrey Hepburn

To plant a garden is to believe in tomorrow . . .

The Audrey Hepburn Rose

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My mother was a gardener and my daughter has inherited the gardening gene and also my son.  I enjoy writing about gardens! In my novel Castle of Dreams I wrote about the rainforest plants and trees and in my WIP I am writing about all things botanical. My protagonist in the modern day is a botanist and my protagonist in the past collects wildflowers and paints botanical pictures. I have written about a medieval garden, a herb garden, an orchard and a vegetable garden. And of course a rose garden. There are dark family secrets and the past impacts on the present. But are some secrets better never to be discovered?

Gardens are a recurring motif in my novels.

Monet’s Garden at Giverny

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Audrey Hepburn:

If I’m honest I have to tell you I still read fairytales and I like them best of all. 

Have a wonderful day, writing, reading, dreaming . . .

Elise

 

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Elizabeth Lhuede – Australian Author

Elizabeth Lhuede will be a speaker at the HNSA Conference Swinburne University Hawthorn, Melbourne, September 8-10 Visit our website to purchase tickets:http://hnsa.org.au/conference/buy-tickets/

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Elizabeth Lhuede has a PhD in Australian poetry and is the author of two novellas, both contemporary romantic suspense, published with Harlequin Escape under her pen-name, Lizzy Chandler. In 2011, still unpublished but with a manuscript ready to submit, Elizabeth began researching Australian publishers and the books they were publishing, particularly books by Australian women. At the same time, she set about establishing an online social media profile, joining Twitter and creating a personal blog. Online, she came across debates raging over gender bias in the reviewing of books by women in mainstream media. As someone guilty of reading more books by men than women, and having read only a few classic books by Australian women (apart from friends’), Elizabeth was inspired to help counter the gender bias by pledging to devote 2012 to reading and reviewing books by Australian women. A number of book bloggers joined her and soon the Australian Women Writers (AWW) challenge was created, with its own blog to host the challenge, and with a declared mission to support and promote books by Australian women. In its sixth year, the AWW challenge now has a searchable database with links to nearly 4000 reviews of books by Australian women. It also has a Facebook group for AWW participants, a dedicated Goodreads group and, on Twitter, over seven-and-a-half thousand followers and its own hashtag (#aww2017). While overseeing the challenge, Elizabeth attracted the attention of a literary agent and, eventually, a publisher, though not in the genre she was expecting. In 2015, her debut romantic suspense novel, Snowy River Man, an ebook, became the most reviewed romance for the challenge that year, and gained Elizabeth a nomination as “Favourite New Romance Author” for 2015 in the Australian Romance Readers Awards. It has since been published in a print anthology with MIRA.

https://elizabethlhuede.com/

The HNSA Melbourne Conference will be a fabulous event with authors such as Elizabeth Lhuede presenting.

Elise

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Historical Fiction

I  will be a speaker at the HNSA Conference Swinburne University Hawthorn, Melbourne, September 8-10 Visit our website to purchase tickets:http://hnsa.org.au/conference/buy-tickets/

The Man Booker Prize for Fiction (formerly known as the Booker-McConnell Prize and commonly known simply as the Booker Prize) is a literary prize awarded each year for the best original novel, written in the English language and published in the UK. The winner of the Man Booker Prize is generally assured international renown and success; therefore, the prize is of great significance for the book trade. From its inception, only Commonwealth, Irish, and South African (later Zimbabwean) citizens were eligible to receive the prize; in 2014, however, this eligibility was widened to any English-language novel.

A high-profile literary award in British culture, the Booker Prize is greeted with great anticipation and fanfare. It is also a mark of distinction for authors to be selected for inclusion in the shortlist or even to be nominated for the “longlist”. Ref: Wikipedia

Historical novels won the Booker Prize in: 2009, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015.

Unknown-1Winner 2009.

I write time slip novels that incorporate historical fiction and the modern day.

People who lived in the past are the same as people today in their hopes and dreams. It is also necessary to understand that they were, in many ways different, depending on the culture and centuries they lived in. But, the dead are real, and in my novels they have power over the living.

In The Voyage of Saint Brendan, an eighth-century Latin account,(‘faction’) about Brendan of Clonfert, there are elements of historical fiction. The genre has been around for a long time.

Historical fiction has an enduring popularity.

One of my favourite historical books is Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind a wonderful evocation of history written by someone who sat on the knees of old Civil War soldiers and listened to their stories.

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I enjoy the research I need to undertake when I write about the past. I create a lost world. It takes me months longer to write the historical part of a novel because of the time I take to research (research is a long piece of string). I enjoy discovering about the postal service, the lighting and heating of rooms and the many small details that make up everyday life in the past. I thread the historical narrative through the story. When seen through the eyes of my historical characters what is strange and unusual to me is not noticed by my characters except for a specific reason.

I enjoyed researching my novel Castle of Dreams set during the Pacific War in a castle in far north Queensland. And, I made friends along the way.  Norwegian publisher Cappelen Damm published Castle of Dreams in translation in April, 2017.

The lovely image below was taken by Elise Cathrin. 

https://elisecathrin.com/2017/05/31/slottet-i-regnskogen-av-elise-mccune/

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‘Historical’ means I write as truthfully and accurately as I can about the past and ‘fiction’ means I can make up my story, dream about the past and inhabit the lives of the people I’ve created. When I’ve finished my story I wait hopefully for my characters to knock on my front door.  I would know them well.

Then after a few weeks I purchase a lovely notebook and start scribbling notes for my next novel. My erstwhile characters are, by now, floating away. I bid them goodbye and wish them well on their journey.

Have a good week, reading, writing and dreaming,

Elise

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